The Alternative Reading List

your supplement for a steralized history
We the Animalsby Justin Torres
We the Animalsstarts off with a gimmick: it’s written in the 3rd person plural & you know how I generally feel about gimmicky books (I don’t like them), but fortunately Torres avoids the pitfalls that seemed to plague the rash of 3rd person plural novels that came out a few years ago. Instead of a nameless, faceless group blob of a protagonist, we get three young brothers.  Because they are not quite white and not quite Puerto Rican, they bond fiercely to one another and the 3rd person plural becomes a symbol for the peculiar—and sometimes destructive—way in which siblings grow up and grow apart. 
The book is very short, though the language is rich and you might find yourself re-reading passages or even whole chapters as you go along.  Unfortunately, the ending seems a little rushed and I think there could have been a better transition between the time jump, or it could have been left out all together.  Overall, it’s a good book and definitely worth checking out. 
Age: Adult
(As a side note, you know by know that I always include a picture of the book’s cover in these little reviews.  While I was looking for a pic for this review, I came across a photo of Justin Torres and, well, is it inappropriate to say: ‘daaaaaaaaaaaammmmmm!’  What, that is inappropriate?  Well, I’ll just have to be inappropriate because daaaaaaammmm!)

We the Animalsby Justin Torres

We the Animalsstarts off with a gimmick: it’s written in the 3rd person plural & you know how I generally feel about gimmicky books (I don’t like them), but fortunately Torres avoids the pitfalls that seemed to plague the rash of 3rd person plural novels that came out a few years ago. Instead of a nameless, faceless group blob of a protagonist, we get three young brothers.  Because they are not quite white and not quite Puerto Rican, they bond fiercely to one another and the 3rd person plural becomes a symbol for the peculiar—and sometimes destructive—way in which siblings grow up and grow apart. 

The book is very short, though the language is rich and you might find yourself re-reading passages or even whole chapters as you go along.  Unfortunately, the ending seems a little rushed and I think there could have been a better transition between the time jump, or it could have been left out all together.  Overall, it’s a good book and definitely worth checking out. 

Age: Adult

(As a side note, you know by know that I always include a picture of the book’s cover in these little reviews.  While I was looking for a pic for this review, I came across a photo of Justin Torres and, well, is it inappropriate to say: ‘daaaaaaaaaaaammmmmm!’  What, that is inappropriate?  Well, I’ll just have to be inappropriate because daaaaaaammmm!)

  1. batsby reblogged this from thealternativereadinglist and added:
    Starting this RIGHT NOW. I should be done later tonight.
  2. thealternativereadinglist posted this